WEEK. 15.11.19

This WEEK: Uber goes gourmet, Moncler Genius pop-ups, Moschino meets Budweiser and non-stop living at Somerset House.

Uber trials gourmet ‘moments’

In San Francisco, you can now book a ravioli-making class or a five-course dinner through Uber.

‘Moments’ is a new service being tested by Uber Eats, as the brand’s evolution from so-called ride-sharing app to what CEO Dara Khosrowshahi has called “the operating system for your daily life” continues apace.

Image Source: Uber
Image Source: Uber


The gourmet experiences are available in the city for just one month, but Uber is clearly experimenting with more ways to expand beyond car-dependent services. This latest trial, like Airbnb’s move to bring ‘experiences’ into its platform, reflects several growing trends.

The preference for consuming experiences among young people is now widely accepted, but Stylus’ report on Uber Moments also picked up on the rise of “local tourism”. This is the desire to “infuse holiday activities into daily routines”, increasingly seen among millennials with relatively low budgets and few holidays.

Time will tell whether new features like this can help Uber reach what is presumably its ultimate destination – a profitable business model.


Moncler pops up with House of Genius

Luxury apparel brand Moncler is bringing its pop-up concept House of Genius to three of the world’s style capitals.

The temporary locations are opening in Tokyo, Milan and Paris until the end of January 2020, with the promise of special merchandise and limited-edition drops inspired by each city.


As well as selling very expensive down jackets and associated items, the stores will host cultural programming and workshops designed to “empower sparks of Genius in the local community”, the brand said.

Shoppers/hypebeasts will be able to procure Moncler T-shirts via a vending machine, while Instagram-friendly one-off items including a skateboard, fire extinguisher and helmet are also available.

Image Source: Instagram
Image Source: Instagram


Moncler is shaking up the traditional idea of a single head designer calling the shots with its 11 Moncler Geniuses, a roster of creative brains that includes Pierpaolo Piccioli, Richard Quinn and Simone Rocha.


Moschino uncaps fresh Budweiser collab

Moschino’s hook-up with Budweiser could be the latest brand collab you didn’t know you needed.

The fashion label is famous for cheeky, unexpected partnerships with brands that exist in completely different worlds, and Creative Director Jeremy Scott’s latest effort is no exception.

A 15-piece capsule collection has been designed by the Moschino maverick, incorporating the US beer’s iconic certificate-style label and restyling the Italian brand as ‘King of Clothes’. (Moschino experts will note that Scott created a Budweiser dress for one of his first runway collections with the brand back in 2014.)

Image Source: Dieline
Image Source: Dieline


Collabs like this capture the spirit of today’s vaguely anarchic, anything-goes internet culture, but they also make sense for established mega brands like Budweiser, who are looking to tap into new audiences and make a familiar story feel fresh again.

‘Always-on’ culture examined at Somerset House

A new exhibition explores the “non-stop nature of modern life” using a multi-sensory journey through five themed zones.

24/7: A Wake-Up Call for Our Non-Stop World is now open at London’s Somerset House, where visitors can engage with multi-disciplinary works exploring how our tech-saturated culture is disrupting natural cycles.


Installations include Iain Forsyth and Jane Pollard’s Somnoproxy, a futuristic bedtime story that takes place in an immersive auditorium. Finnish artist Nastja Säde Rönkkö explores what it was like to live without the internet and communicate only IRL for six months.

Image Source: Somerset House
Image Source: Somerset House


According to the organisers, the experience “holds up a mirror to our always-on culture and invites you to step outside of your day-to-day routine to engage, reflect and reset”.

Running until February 2020, the exhibition was inspired by Jonathan Crary’s 24/7: Late Capitalism and the Ends of Sleep – a book described by one reviewer as “a polemic as finely concentrated as a line of pure cocaine”.




WEEK.

WEEK has been compiled by our Copywriter, Matt, and our Junior Strategist, Alex.

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